It’s All About Relationships in Sales

Team Spirit

When training my team of Property Specialists, I cannot emphasize enough how sales is really about relationships. After all, we are selling to PEOPLE – human beings who have emotions, who go through various life experiences, and who, at the point of being “offered” an investment property, may or may not be at the right place at the right time.

Of course, at the end of the month, the bottom-line always matters. But how do we reach our sales targets while growing in the business of sales?

We develop meaningful relationships with people.

It always starts with genuinely liking people. If we don’t, it will show. We need to learn to have compassion and show kindness, especially when our well-prepared sales pitch and fliers are rejected time and time again. Smile at the face of rejection. Easier said than done, you say. Well, it takes practice – lots of practice.

Before we can even make our “first sales move” or the presentation, a potential client will need to like us. Yes, you read it right. They need to first like us. So we need to exert some effort at being likeable. How do we do this?

Show genuine friendliness. It is often said that it is almost cliché-ish , that the eyes are the window of the soul. I could spot unfriendly, suspicious or malicious eyes a mile away. So can a potential client. So character is key. If we or others begin to notice that we are more ungrateful, more judgmental, more critical of others, more envious, then it’s time for deep self-reflection and change. One cannot fake a genuine smile that begins with the eyes. We cannot give what we do not have.

How else can we make potential clients get to like us?

Look smart and be smart. Let’s face it, people are attracted to good looks. It’s not fair but it is what it is. People are also attracted to well-groomed sales people. This does not mean that women need to wear micro mini skirts and plunging necklines. Sure, this catches a lot of attention, but mostly the wrong attention. It also screams cheap and unprofessional.

Be smart simply means that you know what you’re selling and can present it in the most interesting yet faithful manner, and hopefully in the least amount of time.

Next, a potential client needs to trust us – trust us enough to give us their time and, perhaps, make that investment with us.

They learn to trust us after they like us. It’s not the other way around.

They learn to trust us when we listen to them first. When we ask them the right questions about themselves and not talk about the project yet.

They learn to trust us when they see in our eyes and body language that we truly care about what they are saying, that they have our full attention (put your phone down and stop looking at it) and do not have an agenda. Remember, they already know that we are sales people. Of course they know that we would like to make a sale. Just listen first.

They learn to trust us when we are finally able to identify their “pain” and are able to address it and offer a solution to it.

These are but a few important aspects of developing meaningful relationships in the sales business, but once applied, will turn clients into friends that could last a lifetime.

Believe me, it happened to me.

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Trauma in Paradise

Lonely Beach

Paradise is a subjective word.

I learned this only recently – very recently.

Paradise for me is no longer just a place. It is being with the people I love – wherever we are.

Though living by the beach for a little less than two weeks would be like living in paradise, or so I thought, it was hell-on-earth for me. I did not know it would be. I would not have ventured out when I did otherwise.

I was lonely. My husband couldn’t be with me for many days as work required him to be in the city. I couldn’t do it. I could not last being with people who claimed to treat me as “family” but made me feel isolated. I could not last being away from my husband anymore.

I basically courted depression and anxiety – the very same conditions I thought would somehow be “eased” once I am surrounded by water and working in what seemed to be “ideal” work conditions. At 48 years old, I still don’t know myself that well.

It’s not the place. It never was. I was too anxious about the future and was blinded by the promise of a better career – and an attractive salary – that I did not stop longer to really think and consider. What do people always say? If it’s too good to be true, it usually is.

And I finally saw through it. All this time, I had been listening — hardly talking — and I finally discerned. It helps to just listen. Usually, the more people talk, the more mistakes they make by revealing more of their real motives.

The promises made were as loose as as the fine grains of sand falling between my fingers. True characters were revealed, shattering whatever “good impressions” I may have had. I was lonely. I felt very out of place.

I was very lonely. And I left. I picked up whatever I could carry and headed out to the bus station. I had to leave – for good.

And so now I am home again – with my husband and our 3 dogs. I am still recovering from the trauma.

I will get better. We will get better.

When Change Is Not What You Expected

Panoramic View_Madisons Compound

I guess the title of this blog hints at what’s to come.

The beach – work-life balance. It’s all there.

So why do I find myself feeling lonely even while being tickled by the fine sand underneath my feet, witnessing the majestic waves and being swayed by the non-stop onslaught of fresh salty wind?

Gone is the “honeymoon” phase of my transition, as my sister reminded me. Why did I expect it to last?

Different folks adjust to change – even if it is a “better” change – differently. For some, adjustment takes a couple of weeks, while for others, it will take longer. I guess I am part of the latter.

I expected to be “okay” in under a week. What was I thinking? Why did I put that kind of pressure on myself?

My husband and I are both adjusting in different ways. We left the life and home we knew for more than 3 and a half years. We left behind our three dogs with a caretaker while we prepare their new home.

We left a cool climate up in the mountains to live in a hot, humid (though windy) beach side property. I work up a sweat even while standing still! That’s if I’m not anywhere directly hit by the wind.

I don’t know where or how to begin marketing properties in another unique culture. I have so much to learn!

Change – I will need to give myself the time and space I need to acclimatize – to settle in – to feel like I’m home.

When will this happen? I don’t know. I guess I’ll have to wait it out and live one day at a time.