Liver Spread (Pâté) a la Pinoy

To satisfy a craving for pure (and I mean “pure”) liver spread, I set aside about less than a quarter of a kilo of the liver we bought for chicken adobo. I requested my hubby to fry the liver, not really knowing how to prepare the pâté I thought I could just wing it. How hard can it be?

So I came home to fried chicken liver ready for my experiment.

First mistake: I requested that the liver be fried first before tenderizing. Of course, it was too tough to mash.

Second mistake: I placed the liver in our Black and Decker blender with about a cup of fresh milk and around 63 gms (roughly 1/4 of a 250 gm bar of butter), with salt and pepper to taste.

This was a mistake because the liver was just fried, not tenderized, which made it tough. My blender whirred with much effort at this dry mixture. My blender was also on it’s last legs, I might add, and conked out at just that perfect time after 10 faithful years.

Third mistake: I was exhausted and stressed out and it is never really a good time for me to experiment on recipes in that condition. It took me longer to think of how to remedy the situation – the tough liver – in just a short amount of time. I was anxious to put my tired feet up.

Solution: I boiled the liver mixture (with the milk, butter, salt & pepper) in a pot with more milk, about a cup of milk, at very low heat, making sure to stir from time to time to prevent the mixture from burning.

As the liver softened and the liquid reduced to a mere buttery oil, I turned off the heat and began to mash the liver. Now that was the gruelling part, at least to my arms.

There is an upside to frying the liver before softening. The flavour of the liver is sealed before it is tenderized.

We found that the liver pâté tasted better with cream cheese on toasted bread. Any brand of cream cheese would be good, not necessarily endorsing the brand featured in the photo.

I believe mayo or mustard would work well as a condiment too since either one will lend a tanginess to the rich liver taste.

Overall I believe that my experiment was a success.

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The Right Tools for The Right Job

ToolsThat’s right — the “right” (as opposed to the “left”) tools meant for certain jobs DO make that job easier.

Just a couple of weeks ago as I was de-cluttering and cleaning the house, this thought crossed my mind a few times.

While it is absolutely awful of me not to have changed my scouring pad (for pots and pans) for 2 months, I dilly-dallied on purchasing a new one. Why? I was still able to scrub the black soot off of the pot bottoms with the thinning scouring pad, though it took more elbow grease than necessary.

I became so used to exerting maximum effort that I began to believe that I was using the right tool for the job.

So I finally bought the heavy-duty and thick scouring pad just last week and voila! Just a little pressure from my fingers and the soot on the pans held no resistance. OMG! Why did I delay replacing my old thin scouring pad? All I needed was the right tool for the job.

Some of the other “realizations”:

Floor cleaner to mop the floors — an all-purpose cleaner simply doesn’t do as good a job as a cleaner formulated especially for cleaning the floors. Again, for the sake of not having too many products on hand, I used an all-purpose cleaner for the floors for several weeks. Not the same, especially when you have dogs that drool and leave traces of muddy paw prints in their wake.  It also doesn’t do a great job on glass. The glass cleaner was so much better!

A hack saw to “cut” thick branches – our shrub cutter (like humongous scissors) gave my elbow an unpleasant shock. It was just not built for thick sturdy branches full of hefty thorns. I finally decided, after many months of watching a pomelo tree in the back yard grow at the rate of 1 inch per hour (it seemed that way), to buy a proper saw. The hubby sawed away in just a few minutes. Whew! Now our cable TV satellite is no longer obstructed.

Honestly, not all the DIY posts we see on Facebook or Youtube actually work. I’ve tried many. While I try to avoid using too many chemical- based products, some DIY “earth-friendy” products are just not made for certain jobs.

The right medication and treatment for certain medical conditions – definitely no DIY or self-diagnosing here. A 10-session back therapy for lumbar instability (based on an x-ray) and severe back pain was the right tool for the job. All the mentholated patches, hot pads and exercises did not alleviate the pain because it was NOT muscle pain. I just self-diagnosed it as such.

So I think I will just stick with the right tools. They DO make life a little bit easier.